Between borders
May 4th, 2011
12:09 PM ET

Between borders

Globally, some 600,000 to 800,000 people are trafficked across international borders each year, according to a 2007 report from the U.S. State Department. Of that number, more than 70% are female and half are children. However, a 2009 United Nations report stated that around 20% of all trafficking victims are children.

April 21st, 2011
01:41 PM ET

The who and why of modern-day slavery

CNN's Ramy Inocencio breaks down the who, what and where of modern-day slavery.

Topics: The Facts
April 20th, 2011
10:47 AM ET

The Facts: Slavery, human trafficking definitions

Forced labor, bonded labor, slaves, human trafficking - a broadly accepted definition of what modern slavery encompasses has been elusive. There are many horrible stories of abuse, but not all can be considered slavery. Here is the definition CNN is using to make that determination:

“Slavery occurs when one person completely controls another person, using violence or the threat of violence to maintain that control, exploits them economically, pays them nothing and they cannot walk away.”

What about human trafficking? Human trafficking is defined in the U.N. Trafficking Protocol as "the recruitment, transport, transfer, harbouring or receipt of a person by such means as threat or use of force or other forms of coercion, of adbuction, or fraud or deception for the purpse of exploitation."

The definition on trafficking consists of three core elements:

1) The action of trafficking which means the recruitment, transportation, transfer, harboring or receipt of persons

2) The means of trafficking which includes threat of or use of force, deception, coercion, abuse of power or position of vulnerability

3) The purpose of trafficking which is always exploitation. In the words of the Trafficking Protocol, article 3 "exploitation shall include, at a minimum, the exploitation of the prostitution of others or other forms of sexual exploitation, forced labor or services, slavery or practices similar to slavery, servitude or the removal of organs

Topics: The Facts
The Number: Average price of slave has decreased
April 6th, 2011
12:29 PM ET

The Number: Average price of slave has decreased

The average price of a slave has decreased during the past 200 years, according to Kevin Bales, a leading abolitionist who has written several books about modern-day slavery.

In 1809, the average price of a slave was $40,000 when adjusted to today’s money. In 2009, the average price of a slave was $90, Bales says.

5 things to know about human trafficking
Human trafficking doesn't just happen in far-away places. It can happen anywhere in the world.
March 15th, 2011
05:05 PM ET

5 things to know about human trafficking

By Amanda Kloer, Special to CNN

Editor's Note: Amanda Kloer is an editor with Change.org, where she organizes and promotes campaigns to end human trafficking. She has created numerous reports, documentaries and training materials on human trafficking in the United States and around the world.

Human trafficking might not be something we think about on a daily basis, but this crime affects the communities where we live, the products which we buy and the people who we care about. Want to learn more? Here are the five most important things to know about human trafficking: FULL POST

The challenges of counting a 'hidden population'
March 9th, 2011
07:41 AM ET

The challenges of counting a 'hidden population'

By Manav Tanneeru, CNN

Slavery still exists. Of that there isn’t much dispute, if any. But how widespread is what many experts call modern-day slavery?

Estimates range from about 10 million to 30 million, according to policymakers, activists, journalists and scholars.

The International Labour Organization, an agency of the United Nations that focuses on, among other things, labor rights, put the number at a “minimum estimate” of 12.3 million in a 2005 report.

Kevin Bales, a sociologist who serves as a consultant to the United Nations and has authored several books about modern-day slavery, estimated the number was 27 million people in his book “Disposable People: New Slavery in the Global Economy.” The book was published in 1999.

There is yet another estimate. Siddharth Kara, a fellow on trafficking at Harvard University and also an author, recently told CNN that his calculations put the range between 24 million and 32 million. That number was current as of the end of 2006, he said.

There are several reasons behind the variance in numbers, said Ben Skinner, who published a book about modern-day slavery – “A Crime So Monstrous: Face-to-Face with Modern-day Slavery.”

“There are two big problems with the count,” Skinner, a Senior Fellow at the Schuster Institute for Investigative Journalism at Brandeis University, said during a telephone interview. “The first is that the people we are counting are, by definition, a hidden population.

“The second problem is more of a theoretical one where the definitions are not in place. We don’t have a common definition still as to what slavery is.”

FULL POST

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Topics: In The News • The Facts • The Number
March 8th, 2011
01:13 PM ET

'It's the person next door'

U.S. anti-human trafficking Czar Luis CdeBaca talks with CNN about the role of governments and businesses in fighting slavery and also the historical context of slavery in the United States.

"One of our big problems with this under-reported crime is to not only find it, but then recognize it when we see it," CdeBaca says. FULL POST

Topics: The Facts • Voices
March 7th, 2011
06:19 PM ET

Cost of slaves falls to historic low

(CNN) -- If you have $90 then you could own your slave.

Depending on the kind of person you are that sentence could be at once shocking, saddening or darkly comical. However you might feel though, it’s the plain truth, says Kevin Bales.

The modern-day slavery expert explained to CNN that the current $90 rate for a human slave is actually at an historic low. Two hundred years ago, a slave cost about $40,000 in today’s money. The reason for this price slide: a massive boom in the world’s population, especially in developing countries, has increased the supply of “slaveable” people. FULL POST

March 7th, 2011
01:54 PM ET

Many forms of modern slavery

Slavery takes on many different forms, from the child soldier to the child prostitute on the street. But wherever there's slavery it doesn't just happen in isolated instances. Its invisible tentacles may touch you in ways you may not even know.

Modern-day slavery: A problem that can't be ignored
Photographer Lisa Kristine found these boys in Ghana after they had already been working for 12 hours. As she writes in her book, "Slavery," it was "impossible to know whether it's the cool breeze or fear of empty nets that is making them shake."
March 4th, 2011
11:17 AM ET

Modern-day slavery: A problem that can't be ignored

By Tony Maddox
Executive Vice President and Managing Director of CNN International

You know that moment when you read something, and then immediately have to re-read it because you cannot believe it is true? That happened to me when I read that the levels of slavery and people trafficking today are greater than at any point in history.

Surely that cannot be right? FULL POST

March 4th, 2011
10:34 AM ET

Slavery then and now

Though the traditional chains of slavery are gone, slavery is still very much with the world. CNN's Isha Sesay reports.

Somaly Mam

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Topics: Life In Slavery • Solutions • The Facts • Voices
February 17th, 2011
11:35 AM ET

The Facts: Average price of a slave

In 1809, the average price for a slave was $40,000 (adjusted to today's money). Two hundred years later, in 2009, the average price was just $90, according to Kevin Bales of freetheslaves.org.

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Topics: The Facts
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