October 7th, 2011
03:00 PM ET

U.S. human trafficking czar on how consumers can combat slavery

Recently, a series of reports from CNN's Dan Rivers traced slavery in the supply chain. He began in Cambodia, where a woman grieved for her daughter, to a factory in Malaysia where the girl was forced to work for no pay and, ultimately, went to shops in London that sell the products made by slaves.

Luis CdeBaca, the U.S. human trafficking czar - more formally known as the ambassador-at-large for the U.S. Office to Monitor and Combat Trafficking in Persons - sat down with CNN's Max Foster to talk about what consumers can learn from the reporting and other tips for keeping slavery out of the supply chain. FULL POST

Topics: Business • Solutions • Voices
October 4th, 2011
01:59 PM ET

Tracking factory slaves across Asia

By Dan Rivers, Senior International Correspondent

Penang, Malaysia - We traveled to Cambodia planning to tell the story of an escape from modern-day slave labor but what we found were tales of more women trapped in debt-bondage in Malaysia.

In Cambodia, we found the women who had escaped, but we also learned about dozens of other workers stuck in similar circumstances, unable to get home unless they paid off their "debt" to a recruitment agency. FULL POST

Topics: Business • The Traffickers
September 21st, 2011
11:16 AM ET

Chocolate, cocoa industries' response

Ten years ago, The "Cocoa Protocol" was signed into law, aiming to put a stop to child labor in the cocoa industry. (Read more about what the Cocoa Protocol is) Today, many aid groups say some of the provisions have still not been met by businesses involved.

What does the chocolate and cocoa industry have to say? Individual companies released statements and an industry spokeswoman, Joanna Scott, talked to CNN's Max Foster about what progress has been made and successes the industry has seen.

Watch more in the video.

Topics: Business
September 19th, 2011
01:51 PM ET

The human cost of chocolate

It may be unthinkable that the chocolate we enjoy could come from the hands of children working as slaves. In Ivory Coast and other cocoa-producing countries, there are an estimated 100,000 children working the fields, many against their will, to create the chocolate delicacies enjoyed by Western countries.

Ten years ago, two U.S. lawmakers took action to put a stop to child labor in the cocoa industry. Despite pushback from the industry, the Harkin-Engel Protocol, also known as the Cocoa Protocol, was signed into law on September 19, 2001.

On the 10th anniversary of the legislation, CNN takes a look at what effect this protocol has had on the cocoa industry. Here's a primer on some of the major issues surrounding the issue of slave labor in the cocoa industry: FULL POST

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Topics: Business
September 14th, 2011
11:00 AM ET

Finding legal help to end trafficking

Lexis Nexis' Kenneth Thompson discusses ways in which people can take action to end human trafficking.

Topics: Business • Solutions
July 27th, 2011
12:01 PM ET

In the news: New efforts to combat human trafficking

Federal initiative targets human trafficking in Midwest

Western Missouri and Kansas will be the home base for a new team of six federal enforcement teams targeting human trafficking in the United States, according to a report in the Kansas City Star.

The Anti-Trafficking Coordination team, based in Kansas City, will streamline criminal investigations and prosecution of violators of federal slavery laws. FULL POST

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Topics: Business • Government • In The News
3 voices: How to end modern-day slavery
Photographer Lisa Kristine traveled to Nepal to document modern-day slavery, including this young girl who started carrying stones because her family is in debt bondage. (More at http://www.lisakristine.com)
July 12th, 2011
08:17 AM ET

3 voices: How to end modern-day slavery

By Liane Membis, CNN

It seems impossible.

Human trafficking cases, blind promises of freedom, forced prostitution rings — these aspects of modern-day slavery come to light all too often.

Estimates of the number of slaves worldwide range from about 10 million to 30 million, according to policymakers, activists, journalists and scholars. Approximately 100,000 victims are in the United States, working as slaves inside homes, in agricultural fields, in the sex industry and other places, according to the U.S. Department of State’s 2011 Trafficking in Persons Report.

That’s millions of women, children and men struggling to escape captivity. That’s millions of people wondering what it means or what it would take to be free again.

But what about solutions - How can we end modern-day slavery? Three experts weigh in on what businesses, governments, the public and individuals must do. FULL POST

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Topics: Business • Government • How to Help • Solutions • Voices
April 22nd, 2011
05:15 PM ET

Ending slavery at 'the tipping point'

Chris Davis of The Body Shop talks about the company's commitment to fight human trafficking.

Topics: Business
April 22nd, 2011
04:12 PM ET

How to help: Businesses and consumers

Slavery is everybody’s business. Its reach is vast — so vast that it affects each and every one of us in some way. Slavery can be found in the food we eat, the clothes we wear, across the world and in our very own backyard. But we all have the power to push back.

Recently, CNN has explored what businesses and consumers can do to promote ethical production and consumption. FULL POST

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Topics: Business • How to Help
April 20th, 2011
11:28 AM ET

Business zero-tolerance for trafficking

The president of the world's largest employment agency explains what large and small businesses can do to fight slavery.

Topics: Business • Solutions
April 18th, 2011
11:22 PM ET

Victims break chains of slavery

By Brian Byrnes, CNN

Buenos Aires - Maria Velasquez was in need of work. She had no prospects in her hometown of La Paz, Bolivia, so when she was offered a bus ticket to Argentina and assured of steady work and a home there, she jumped at the chance.

It was a trip that would take her to the depths of the garment industry's slave labor trade only to emerge as a member of a cooperative credited with raising awareness about slave labor on two continents.

"I was promised a sewing job in Argentina that would pay a dignified salary of $200 a month. But just like so many other victims, I was lied to," says Velasquez, 31.

She quickly became a victim trapped inside a vast network of workers who are lured from Bolivia to Argentina on empty promises. FULL POST

Topics: Business • Life In Slavery • Solutions
April 18th, 2011
12:08 PM ET

Is your rug slave-free?

Goodweave USA is trying to put a stop to child slave labor practices in Asian rug factories, as CNN's Maggie Lake reports.

Topics: Business • Solutions
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