Opinion: Anti-slavery law needs saving
August 31st, 2012
09:54 AM ET

Opinion: Anti-slavery law needs saving

Editor's note: Jesse Eaves works as the senior policy adviser for child protection with World Vision, an international Christian humanitarian organization working in nearly 100 countries around the world. Mary C. Ellison currently serves as the director of policy for Polaris Project, a leading organization in the United States combating all forms of human trafficking and serving both U.S. citizens and foreign national victims, including men, women, and children. Together they are calling on U.S voters to make sure their senators pass a key anti-slavery bill.

With the upcoming elections, you can’t turn on the television without seeing a negative campaign ad or heated news segment giving Americans a glimpse of the political divisions that currently exist in our country.

While politicians argue over our future government, we lose sight of how the actions of our current government are impacting the lives of real people right now, like the millions of enslaved men, women and children in the U.S. and around the world at risk if Congress fails to pass the Trafficking Victims Protection Reauthorization Act by the end of the year.


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Topics: Government • How to Help • In The News • Uncategorized
Report: Trafficking ring busted in Angola
August 27th, 2012
05:46 PM ET

Report: Trafficking ring busted in Angola

Dozens of Chinese criminal suspects living in Angola were sent back to Beijing on a chartered flight over the weekend, state media reported.

The 37 suspects were allegedly involved in a variety of crimes, such as kidnapping, human trafficking and forcing women into prostitution, according to the Xinhua news agency.

Authorities rescued 14 Chinese victims, who were sent from the capital of Luanda, on the same flight Saturday, Xinhua said.

The suspects lured women to Angola with promises of jobs and forced them to engage in prostitution, Chinese police said.

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Topics: In The News
August 13th, 2012
09:26 AM ET

Trafficking class for men using prostitutes

By Richard Roth and Patrick Feeeney, CNN - More than 25 men sit in an attorney's office - each was arrested for prostitution-related offences and each is now trying to avoid jail.

But this is not a defense lawyer's office. It's the Brooklyn district attorney's office and the road away from jail is a lesson in the risks of using prostitutes - Johns School.

Assistant District Attorney Grace Brainard tells them: "The crimes you were arrested for would lead to one penalty and one penalty only and that is jail time. And the next time you are arrested for prostitution, jail time will be the only offer on the table."

The men were arrested for attempting to pay for sex from undercover policewomen posing as prostitutes on the streets of New York. Men who solicit prostitutes are so-called 'johns' and this gathering is known as Johns School.


Topics: In The News • Solutions
U.S. states of play in anti-trafficking laws
The Polaris Project map splits the U.S. into four tiers, one being the best, based on anti-trafficking measures.
August 8th, 2012
01:52 PM ET

U.S. states of play in anti-trafficking laws

The state of Massachusetts was named among the most improved in the U.S. in 2012 after it passed wide-ranging anti-human trafficking laws.

A report published by Polaris Project, one of the leading organizations in the global fight against human trafficking and modern-day slavery, rated and placed all 50 states plus the District of Columbia in one of four tiers based on the human trafficking laws in the state.

South Carolina, West Virginia and Ohio were also rated 'most improved' for taking concrete steps to address human trafficking. Of those states, Massachusetts was singled out for particular praise as it is now also ranked in the top four states having the strongest legal framework.