Opinion: New revelations about slaves and slave trade
The new "Atlas" of the slave trade provides 189 maps tracing the voyages.
February 14th, 2011
02:04 PM ET

Opinion: New revelations about slaves and slave trade

Editor's note: David Eltis and David Richardson are co-authors of the "Atlas of the Transatlantic Slave Trade." Eltis is Robert W. Woodruff professor of history at Emory University and co-editor of the Transatlantic Slave Trade database. Richardson is the director of the Wilberforce Institute for the Study of Slavery and Emancipation at the University of Hull, England.

Most students of American history understand that a dramatic re-peopling of North and South America began in the years after Christopher Columbus first landed in the New World. But they may not realize that it was Africa, not Europe, that formed the wellspring of this repopulation process.

In the 3¼ centuries between 1492 and about 1820, four enslaved Africans left the Old World for every European. During those years, Africans comprised the largest forced oceanic migration in the history of the world. Who were they? Who organized the slaving voyages? Which parts of Africa did they come from? How did they reach the Americas? And where exactly did they go?

Strikingly, we can now provide better answers to such questions for Africans than we can for European migrants. The African slave trade reduced people to commodities, but commodities generated profits, and where there were profits there was generally good record-keeping. FULL POST

February 14th, 2011
01:19 PM ET

Sold into slavery

Rani Hong, sold into child slavery at age 7, shares her story and how she now works to prevent that from happening to others while also revealing an inside look at how child trafficking works.

February 14th, 2011
01:17 PM ET

The Facts: Trafficking victims vs. murder victims

In the United States, the number of trafficking victims is roughly equivalent to the number of murders each year, according to "The Slave Next Door" by Kevin Bales. And while 90 percent of murder cases are solved, only 1 percent of trafficking cases ever reach prosecution.

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Topics: The Facts
February 14th, 2011
12:10 PM ET

Held in slavery, now free

They arrived in the United States from West Africa, young girls held against their will and forced to work for hours on end. But this time, it didn't happen hundreds of years ago.

Nicole's journey started in 2002, when she was barely 12, in her small village in western Ghana. She and about 20 other girls were held in plain sight, but always under the watchful eyes of their captors.

"It was like being trapped, like being in a cage," said "Nicole," now 19. CNN agreed not to use her real name.

"I always have to behave, behave, behave, behave. No freedom at all." FULL POST